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>> tonight, battle for libya. u.s.-led attacks and enforcing a no-fly zone intensifies for a second day. but the pentagon says, muammar qaddafi is not a target. i'm russ mitchell. also tonight, on the ground, a defiant qaddafi shoots back bowing a long war as rebels take rounds in benghazi. >> anxiety rises in quake ravaged japan as food and water show signs of nuclear contamination. >>> and staying connected, technology provide's lifeline for students trying to find loved ones in japan's disaster zone. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> good evening. a second wave of u.s.-led air attacks against libya is under way tonight as b2 bombers from the first wave return to their base in missouri late tonight. on the ground, u.s. aircraft attack libyan forces south of benghazi for the first time while muammar qaddafi remained defiant, calling nations allied against him the party of satan and vowing to fight inch by inch for his country. we have correspondents on the ground in libya and in washington with the latest and we begin with national se
>>> making his case. president obama defends the u.s. mission in libya. >> some nations may be able to turn a blind eye to atrocities in other countries. the united states of america is different. >>> discrimination suit. america's biggest retailer on edge as the supreme court takes up one of the biggest workplace lawsuits in history. >>> and caught on tape. a vintage air force plane makes an unexpected water landing. this is the "cbs morning news" an unexpected water landing. this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 29th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. defending the u.s. military mission in libya. president obama says the operation was necessary to prevent a campaign of killing. this morning rebel forces continue to push west under the cover of allied air support. nato takes command of the operation tomorrow. secretary of state clinton arrived in london last night. this morning she will attend a conference to discuss what comes next in libya. last night the president said u.s. actions in libya stopped a slaughter a
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americans from japan and u.s. officials reminded those staying behind to get out of that 50-mile danger zone around the fukushima dai-ichi plant. the reactors damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami were bombarded today with water mr. from helicopters, police water cannons and fire trucks to try to cool them off and prevent a meltdown, but it's not at all clear if it's working. and in washington, the head of the nuclear regulatory commission said it could take weeks to get these reactors under control. bill whitaker in japan begins our coverage. >> reporter: this new video released today gives the clearest picture yet of the stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. >> what we're seeing is that the damage from the fires is very significant. >> reporter: today, japanese military helicopters with protective led-lined cockpits dumped water on reactor three, attempting to cool the nuclear fuel rods. but much of the water appeared to disperse in the wind. police and firefighters also brought in water cannons to douse the reactor but
>> couric: tonight, as allied forces pound targets in libya, the u.s. military insists qaddafi is not a target, but the commander in chief makes it clear... >> it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebels solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the opera
establish the no-fly zone and suppress his air defences. >> reporter: the secretaries also made clear u.s. policy that moammar qaddafi must go is not the aim of the current mission. >> one of the things that i think is central is you don't, in a military campaign, set as a mission or a goal something you're not sure you can achieve. >> reporter: the critics on capitol hill say the administration's policy lacks clarity. >> i think there should have been a plan for what our objectives were, a debate as to why this was in our vital interest before we committed military forces to libya rd today nato assumed full command of the mission. the president says america's role will be limited. >> we're not putting any ground forces into libya. >> reporter: and that other union heaveal in the middle east like the recent bloody crack down in syria will be looked at case by case. >> each of these, we are looking at and an liz will-- analyzing carefully. but we can't draw some general, sweeping conclusions about the entire region. >> reporter: and president obama makes his pitch monday evening in a telev
are found in tokyo's water supply, as the u.s. bans the import of some japanese foods. >> right there. right there! >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a monster of the deep. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. we will not surrender. those words, the defiant libyan leader moammar gadhafi, who made his first public appearance in a week. despite the allied-imposed no-fly zone, libyan troops continued their unrelenting attacks against rebel-held cities where conditions are described as desperate. the u.s. military says it is considering all options. explosions were heard in tripoli this morning. and susan mcginnis is in washington with more on this story. good morning, susan. >> hi, good morning, betty. the mission in libya is accomplishing its goal, including grounding gadhafi's air force. but as criticism of the operation grows, along with the cost, the u.s. is looking to hand off control. despite a fourth night of allied air strikes pounding libya, leader
. still, u.s. warships and planes helping with relief efforts temporarily moved away from the area as a precaution. crews have been desperately trying to avoid a nuclear meltdown at the facility since it was damaged in friday's powerful earthquake. over the weekend they dumped sea water into the reactors to try to cool them down. more than 180,000 residents were also evacuated, and had to be scanned for radiation before entering shelters. across the northeast coast, more than 10,000 people are believed to be dead from the magnitude 9 quake, and tsunami. dramatic new video captured violent waves that slammed ashore, wiping out entire villages. since the massive earthquake three days ago, aftershocks continue to rattle the region. an average of 12 to 15 per hour. some more than 6.0 in magnitude. but there are stories of survival. crews rescued this 60-year-old man who was clinging to what was left of his roof. this man also made it out alive. i thought i was dying when i was pushed into the water, he says. but with thoughts of my family i decided to make every effort to survive. but
the president's plan. >>> fallout fears. the pentagon considers the mandatory evacuation of all u.s. military personnel threatened by radiation in japan as the first american victim of the tragedy is found. >>> and medical marvel. a texas man gets the first full facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning and thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. this morning allied forces are working to expand the no fly zone over libya. overnight tripoli was targeted for the third day in a row and there is growing discord among the allies and here in this country over the u.s. role. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. >> reporter: several days of attacks on libya are having their intended effect according to u.s. officials, even so, more in congress are questioning the president's decisions. anti-aircraft fire erupted in tripoli overnight as moammar gadhafi's forces battled a fresh round of air strikes. u.s. officials say days of attacks on the regi
-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations full-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations of american citizens. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to enstall a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wondering where i am. we've been trying to make our way to the quake zone. the japanese military has taken o
@captioncolorado.com >> couric: tonight, the u.s. loses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> ( translated ): we will win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat: nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrender. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a numbe
have been discontinued. japanese officials said today they are asking the u.s. government for help. charlie d'agata is in niigata, japan, with more. good morning, charlie. >> reporter: good morning to you, betty. nobody is watching the events unfolding at the nuclear power plant more closely than the people here. many who were evacuated from the region around that plant and wonder if they'll ever be able to go home. fire trucks resumed blasting water onto japan's crippled nuclear power plant as crews raced to restore power to the facility. as early as today, they hope to feed electricity to at least two of the six overheated reactors, and get crucial water pumps working again. >> if the cooling systems in the reactors and fuel pumps are basically sound, and then the power comes on, then we might look at that moment as the beginning of the end of this crisis. >> reporter: but even if the power starts back up, it's not clear the water pumps will. they may have already suffered too much damage. there are also fears that getting power back online could spark another explosion. smoke bi
to the west. >>> training accident. a jet engine explodes and catches fire aboard a u.s. aircraft carrier. >>> and cold case. the fbi can't crack this code. >>> and cold case. the fbi can't crack this code. can you? captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us today, i'm betty nguyen. we begin in libya, where cia operatives have been on the ground gathering intelligence, and making contact with rebel forces. the rebel troops are being pushed back by libyan forces, losing about 100 miles in two days. meanwhile, a key adviser to moammar gadhafi has resigned amid some international intrigue. joel brown is in washington. good morning, joel. bring us up to speed. >> a lot going on, betty. good morning to you. we're learning now the cia's been on the ground in libya for weeks now, in some cases working hand in hand with the rebels. but whether or not to supply weapons to the opposition is a whole other matter that sparks fierce debate here in washington. cia operatives are reportedly on the ground in libya. the intelligence agency sent in small teams earlier this
to see you on this monday. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. the pentagon says the u.s.-led air assault on libya has been very effective, inflicting heavy damage on government forces. the air strikes included over 120 cruise missiles, bt bombers and jet fighters. one of moammar gadhafi's compounds in tripoli was hit. but u.s. officials say gadhafi is not a target. the libyan dictator promises a long, hard war. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. susan, good morning to you. >> hi, good morning, terrell. after a weekend of heavy air strikes on libya, the main issue in washington is, where to go from here. u.s. officials are now planning a more limited role for u.s. forces going forward. u.s. officials are not planning to lead the mission in libya much longer. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. >> reporter: following a weekend of missile strikes and air patrols, defense secretary robert gates said the pentagon will soon hand over the reins to either the french and british, or to nato. his comments came as american
are struggling to contain the threat of multiple meltdowns. flooding across large parts of the u.s. force some residents out of their homes and on to higher ground. and pushed out. the state department spokesman quits after causing the treatment of the suspected wikileaks leaker ridiculous. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. we are getting a clearer picture of the death and devastation in japan caused by friday's massive earthquake and tsunami. here's the latest. japan has now upgraded the quake to a magnitude 9. more than 1400 people are confirmed dead, with fears the toll could surge past 10,000. authorities say there is a risk of another nuclear reactor explosion, but u.s. officials say there is no radiation threat to the west coast. dent all along the we have correspondents all along the earthquake zone tonight and we begin with ben tracey in tokyo. >> reporter: the port town of minamisanriku on the northeastern coast is nearly wiped out and in the area near there authorities now fear 10,000 people may be dead. when
. >> reporter: worry about the stability of countries in the middle east, now worry about u.s. economic recovery is urging the obama administration toward tapping the strategic reserve. >> it is one we are considering, it has been done in very rare occasions there is a bunch of factors that have to be looked at and it is just not the price. >> reporter: america's strategic petroleum research every holds 777 million-barrels of oil. selling oil from the reserve at $100 a barrel could ease the federal deficit but new york times report online says obama administration is concerned about taking oil from the reserve when there is excess oil production capacity around the world. when the reserve was tapped in 2005 after hurricane katrina. oil prices dropped 9% now? >> i think it is time and we need to look at other sources of energy. >> reporter: now is not the time some say. >> not the strategic reserve i am buying an electric car tomorrow and it will give me the patriotic pleasure of not sending money overseas to someone trying to blow us up. >>> tapping the reserve would free up supply but only have
much time. u.s. and allied warships are stationed off the coast of libya ready to launch cruise missile that would take out qaddafi's command centers and air defense network. after that, aircraft-- mostly british and french operating from bases in the mediterranean-- would enforce a no-fly zone and threaten his ground forces with air strikes if they attack the rebels. the president promised no american troops would gol into libya while one way or another, said secretary of state clinton, qaddafi has to go. >> we do believe that a final result of any negotiations would have to be the decision by colonel qaddafi to leave. >> reporter: secretary clinton will be in paris tomorrow for one last round of talks with allies. but unless qaddafi orders first a cease-fire and then a retreat, the time for talking seems to be up. tonight there is no sign qaddafi's forces are observing a cease-fire much less pulling back. in fact, one u.s. official says they are still advancing on benghazi. harry? >> smith: david, what happens if these qaddafi forces keep moving toward benghazi? >> reporter: benghazi
. officials have been scrambling to avoid a meltdown ever since and are now asking the u.s. for help. >> in particular they have asked for additional types of equipment that will help provide water and other types of resources to ensure that the reactors continue to be cooled. >> reporter: fears of a full blown meltdown have spread all the way to tokyo located 150 miles from the plant. officials there have detected low levels of radiation and a shift in winds threatens to push it even further. even without a possible nuclear disaster, japan is facing its worst crisis since world war ii. death toll jumped to more than 2400 confirmed dead, but officials warn that number is likely to top 10,000. and now the country faces an economic crisis, as well. this morning japanese stocks plummeted more than 10%. as far as that radiation cloud, as i said, they have picked up low levels of radiation outside of tokyo, but there is another concern whether it intensifies and the wind shifts, it could head toward that area that was hardest hit by the earthquake and tsunami that followed. >> as we hear
's stricken nuclear power plant, the u.s. is arranging charter flights for americans who want to leave japan. i'm charlie d'agata in yoshita, japan, with the story coming up. >> the desperate search for loved ones during japan's worst crisis since world war ii. good morning, it is thursday, march 17, 2011, st. patrick's day. i'm sydnie kohara. >> hi, everybody. i'm frank mallicoat. it's 4:30. a good day to be hoop fans. we have a lot of basketball here on cbs. >> weather-wise, we have a lot of rain don't we, lawrence. >> all this rain is going to make everything nice and green around the bay area. yeah, happy st. patrick's day, folks. if you are heading out, things are going to be mostly dry today. but we do have a chance of a few showers north of the golden gate bridge. behind that, though, we have a significant storm system. that one is on the way. looks like friday could be a very wet and wild day around the bay area. we'll have more on that coming up. right now, let's get a check of traffic with elizabeth. >> dry for now. it's made for a very calm quiet start to our morning commute. in f
no action on the nation's gridirons this fall. and quake questions-- this town prepared in the u.s. for an earthquake as strong as the one that hit japan. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. it is already sunday morning in japan, and another major aftershock has just hit the country which is still digging out after friday's disastrous 8.9-magnitude earthquake. here's the latest-- an explosion at a nuclear power plant forced 170,000 people to evacuate while an emergency was declared tonight at a second reactor in the same complex. roads and buildings throughout the area have been devastated, and hundreds of thousands are stranded without food or water. we have correspondents all along the earthquake zone tonight and we begin with ben tracy in tokyo. >> reporter: with more cameras on the ground, we are now getting our closest look yet at the extent of the damage. it is simply overwhelming. in hard-hit sendai, a city of one million people, police say they found as many as 300 bodies washed up on the beach as the
@captioncolorado.com >>> good morning. breaking news. a u.s. war plane crashes in libya but the americans are board are said to be safe after a third night of attacks on tripoli and growing diplomatic battles who should take the lead in this mission. we will get the latest from libya and talk with senator john mccain about what is next for the u.s. and its allies. >>> fallout fears. japanese officials say the struggle to control leaking radiation at a crippled nuclear plant could go on for weeks as water in one of the storage pools becomes dangerously hot. concerns continue to grow over radiation leaking into the food and water supply while the death toll continues to skyrocket, "early" this tuesday morning, march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "the early show" here on a tuesday morning. chris wragge along with erica hill. you're seeing pictures of an f-15 eagle strike down over libya late last night. >> breaking news we are following this morning. we want to get you the very late evidentest on that american fighter jet. you can see it crashed and what happened to the two on bors, david
>>> airport ambush. two u.s. airmen are dead, and two more wounded in germany. the suspect is now being questioned by authorities. >>> family horror. a 12-year-old colorado boy is in custody, accused of killing his parents. >>> and deadline day for pro football. the contract between the nfl players union and team owners the contract between the nfl players union and team owners expires at midnight. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. investigators in germany are trying to figure out why a gunman opened fire on a busload of u.s. airmen, killing two, and seriously wounding two others. it happened yesterday at the frankfurt airport. the suspect is an employee at that airport. charlie d'agata has the latest. >> reporter: the two u.s. airmen killed wednesday had not even made it to the battlefield. they were with 11 other military personnel on this bus outside the frankfurt, germany, airport, when the gunman opened fire. police say the suspect, 21-year-old arid uka is a citizen of kosovo, an airport employee and a devout muslim
details coming up. >>> the u.s. opens fire on libya. what prompted the president's decision and how gadhafi is reacting. >> and swept away by the tsunami. what became of the driver. >> good evening, a stormy day and we're not in the clear yet. another wave of heavy rain and strong winds is moving in at this hour. meteorologist, lawrence has more on that in a minute, but our team coverage begins with don knapp in san francisco and the mess left behind by the storm so far. don. >> and this wet and wild weekend is about to get a little wilder with the wind warnings coming up. there are wind advisories all the way down to the 50-mile an hour winds on the golden gate tonight and on the san mateo bridge. the big rigs and box trucks are restricted. that wind has already done damage on land. >> crews work to cut up and remove a 90-foot oak that crashed on to a house on walnut creek this evening. dropping the tree on to the roof, knocking out skylights and poking holes. no one was hurt. earlier today, wind and rain shut down highway 84 between skyline boulevard. falling trees brought dow
in libya. rebels flee as qaddafi's military advances and now a fierce debate-- should the u.s. arm the opposition? i'm erica hill. also tonight, kicking the habit: the president wants to cut oil imports by a third, and some drivers have already gotten the message. hyperactive kids-- why some experts believe artificial food coloring could make the behavior worse. >> mr. president! >> and a bullet meant for president reagan nearly took this man's life. 30 years later james brady is still fighting for gun control. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> hill: good evening, katie is off tonight. just two days ago, libyan rebels seemed ready to move on moammar qaddafi's home town and possibly on tripoli, but tonight, they are on the move in the other direction. their weapons, machine guns for the most part are, no match for qaddafi's heavier weaponry. secretary of state hillary clinton said today no decision has been made about whether to arm the rebels, but there are also reports that president obama
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
'll see you in 30 minutes, cbs evening news is next. >> couric: tonight president obama warns the u.s. and nato are considering a military response to the crisis in libya as qaddafi's forces step up attacks on rebel-held oil towns. i'm katie couric. the violence is driving up the price you pay at the pump. but where's the money going? maybe not where you think, and should the u.s. tap the strategic reserves to bring prices down? they're here, the new 3-d mammograms. but should women be rushing to get one? and she's worn his m.i.a. bracelet for nearly 40 years waiting for the day she could remove it. that day has come. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. libyan government forces were back on the offensive today trying to retake more territory still held by the rebels. some of the heaviest fighting was in towns near tripoli and the u.n. says more than a million libyans now need humanitarian aid. president obama warned moammar qaddafi and his supporters they will be
>>> rebel retreat. libyan troops have opposition forces on the run. but for how long? as the u.s. considers arming the insurgency. >>> cajun cleanup. a powerful storm rolls through louisiana, threatening the southeast with flooding and high winds. >>> and union fight. ohio can vote on limiting collective bargaining rights, as the battle in wisconsin goes to collective bargaining rights, as the battle in wisconsin goes to court. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. this morning, the back and forth fighting in libya has turned against the rebel troops. opposition forces are on the run, fleeing the latest government counterattack. the rebels were trying to advance on moammar gadhafi's hometown of sirte. they've also had to leave two critical oil ports, brega and ras lanuf. the u.s. navy launched a new barrage of cruise missiles at targets near tripoli and nato takes command of the operation today. joel brown is in washington with more. good morning, joel. what's the latest? >> betty, it wasn't even a close fight. gadhafi forc
. also tonight, passing the baton. the u.s. is planning to turn over leadership of the libya mission to nato. tokyo's water is declared safe again, but not before a radiation scare causes a run on bottled water. and an air traffic controller in washington is suspended after falling asleep. leaving commercial jetliners to land on their own. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. every so often the census bureau gives americans a look in the mirror to see who we are and how we're changing and a report from the bureau today says one thing that's changing is the racial and ethnic makeup of the country with the hispanic population growing rapidly. one out of six adults is now hispanic as is one out of four children. in the past ten years, the overall u.s. population has grown by 27 million to 308 million and hispanics account for more than half the increase. more now from nancy cordes. >> reporter: salt lake city's newest grocery store caters to a group that census figur
over libya. the u.s. continues to move forces closer to libya. the president authorized u.s. military aircraft to help egyptians evacuate. but the administration is trying not to get sucked in to a mideast conflict. the president's hope is that gadhafi will head off a bloody stalemate and make way for new leadership. randall pinkston, cbs news, at the united nations. >>> the u.s. is asking iran for help returning ex-fbi agent robert levinson to his family. there's been no word on levinson since he vanished from the iranian island of kish four years ago while doing private detective work. iran has insisted they know nothing about his disappearance. levinson's family, though, has received proof that he is alive, and on thursday, secretary of state hillary rodham clinton said there are indications that he is in southwest asia. levinson's wife said, quote, our family is tremendously encouraged by the news that bob is alive, but remains concerned for his safety and well-being. >>> a u.s. aid contractor facing up to 20 years in prison goes on trial today in cuba. allen gross, seen here with
across the pacific to the u.s. reaching the west coast. japan declares a state of emergency at a nuclear plant as radiation levels surge. the area around it is evacuated. and the ring of fire. why this area of the pacific is so vulnerable to earthquakes. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it is saturday morning in japan. the sun is up and the extent of the catastrophe is becoming painfully clear. it's been nearly 24 hours since a powerful earthquake touched off a huge tsunami that swept across japan's east coast. the quake, a magnitude 8.9, was the fifth-largest in modern history. centered off japan's northeast coast, it was felt for 1,300 miles. very early reports say more than 400 people are dead. japan's kyoto news agency says the final number is expected to top 1,000. most of the victims drowned. nearly 1,000 are reported injured, more than 500 are missing. and four million homes and businesses lost power. the first estimate of the damage: $10 billion. that dama
over land. u.s. helicopter crews returning from elite missions have tested positive for radiation and had to be decontaminated, some given potassium iodide pills as a precaution. millions spent a fourth night with little food and water in freezing temperatures. concerned relatives wait in long lines at evacuation centers for any word of their missing loved ones. this come fears her only son is dead -- this woman fears her only son is dead. people saw the tsunami wash him away in his car. rescue crews around the world are searching for survivors and there are moments of triumph. a man was pulled alive from the rubble after being buried for four days and a 70-year-old woman was also rescued. >>> new quakes continue to rock japan. charlie d'agata felt a 6.0 magnitude earthquake when he was reporting live with us. >> what are happening to these refugees, where are they going? [ pause ] >> well... >> reporter: i don't know did the camera just move there? because we had aftershocks. the camera did move, yes. we have had aftershocks all day. >> well, there you go. the epicenter of that q
with katie couric" is next. libya tempts by the army to retake lost territory. the u.s. steps up the pressure on qaddafi to quit, but he's still not giving up. i'm katie couric. also tonight, deep trouble in the midwest. heavy rain and melting snow adds up to flooding that's sweeping through hundreds of homes. are teachers taking a lesson from the labor dispute in wisconsin? a union leader is giving some ground on the red-hot issue of tenure. and the american spirit. an artist who brings to life a world his eyes cannot see. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. moammar qaddafi's latest offensive was a colossal failure and tonight he's more isolated than ever. troops loyal to qaddafi tried to retake three cities overnight but they were repelled by rebel forces. today in one of those cities, zawiyah, there were celebrations in the streets. the people are firmly in charge and demanding qaddafi go. secretary of state hillary clinton warned that unless he does, libya is at risk
to libya now where nato warships are patrolling off the coast. u.s. officials say the libyan air force is no longer a factor. meanwhile, libyan ground forces still trying to retake rebel-held positions are being attacked by allied warplanes. terrell brown reports. >> reporter: traces of anti-aircraft fire pierce the night sky in tripoli. amid reports of explosions in the eastern part of the capital. there's also word that coalition forces have hit moammar gadhafi's kand in ajdabiya. rebels moving up their front line are confident they'll soon be able to take that city. >> this is a matter of time. time only. after maybe one day or less than one day, these tanks will surrender. >> reporter: coalition planes also bombed gadhafi's forces in misrata, to stop them from shelling civilians. secretary of state hillary clinton says colonel gadhafi has the power to stop all of this. >> the quickest way for him to end this is to actually serve the libyan people by leaving. >> reporter: the white house has repeatedly stated gadhafi must go. but the u.n. resolution calls for protection of the libya
morning, joel. yeah, washington is watching higher oil prices, and considering u.s. dependence on foreign oil, it's now looking at a much closer alternative. the white house is considering tapping the nation's oil reserves to try to put a cap on runaway oil prices. >> all matters have to be on the table when you go through -- when you see the difficulty coming out of the economic crisis we're in, and the fragility of it. >> reporter: the strategic petroleum reserves, the u.s. government's emergency oil supply, holds 727 million barrels right now. that's enough to provide the nation the oil it needs for a couple of months. after hurricane katrina, the government released 30 million barrels. oil prices dropped nearly 4%. during the first gulf war, 34 million barrels were released and prices dropped a third in one day. but the price of gasoline up 33 cents a gallon in the past two weeks, drivers will take any break they can get. >> i used to make it three, four days with $75 of gas. now every two days i've got to put $75 in this car. so, you know, it's ridiculous. >> as a student it's kind o
and tsunami, a desperate search for food, water and missing loved ones. and on the u.s. west coast, fears of radiation results in a run on potassium iodide. but is there really cause for concern? captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. japan is dealing tonight with the aftermath of one catastrophe while trying to prevent another. we'll have much more about the earthquake and tsunami in a moment. the official death toll is nearly 3,400. but first, the nuclear crisis. radiation continues to leak from damaged nuclear reactors in fukushima, 140 miles north of tokyo. an estimated 50 workers are still trying desperately to cool them to prevent a meltdown. in the meantime, 70,000 people have been evacuated from an area within 12 miles of the dai-ichi plant and 140,000 more living within 120 miles of the facility have been told to stay inside. japan has imposed a no-fly zone over that area for commercial air traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on ame
. at the same time, u.s. and coalition partners kept up the military attacks, launching 22 cruise missile on targets in tripoli. qaddafi's forces, however, are still better armed than the opposition and today they have the rebels on the run. they were forced to retreat just as they prepared to attack qaddafi's hometown of surt. instead, though, they were pushed back more than 25 miles, and not just by the military but by civilians who remain loyal to qaddafi. mandy clark reports tonight from the ever-shifting front line. >> reporter: an attack by qaddafi forces took rebels by surprise at bin jawad. they fought hard with everything they had but were forced back. and even while fleeing came under fire. they had originally retreated to the town because of a new threat rebels here say it wasn't just government forces but also residents firing from their homes that forced them to pull back. they confiscated these weapons handed out by qaddafi forces from locals who were loyal to the regime. how many weapons did you find in total? >> reporter: another problem the anti-qaddafi forces are facing:
with rescues and the recovery. u.s. marines are already starting to deploy critically needed supplies. charlie d'agata, cbs news, tokyo. >> it was crescent city that saw the highest tsunami waves in the u.s. 8-foot surges. crews are waiting for safer conditions to begin clean up of the damaged harbor. there are at least 17 damaged and sunken vessels and also the smell of boat fuel and oil. in addition, there are rocks, logs and other debris that need to be cleared away. >> we do get a small tsunami once in a while or surge in here and it breaks the docks up but this is the worst i have ever experienced. >> the harbor is crescent city's life blood and the sheriff says it is going to be hard to recover. >>> this is a look at the wave coming into the crescent city harbor. authorities released the name of the man swept out to sea while taking pictures of the waves. 25-year-old dustin webber. he was with two other people when they were all washed into the ocean. the two other people managed to survive and swim to safety. even parts of northern california that did not suffer damage from the tsunami
pictures, ro, take a look. >> couric: tonight, libya's oil facilities under attack as the u.s. gets set to talk to nato allies about imposing a no-fly zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, a difficult ash wednesday for some catholics. parishioners in the philadelphia area learn if their priest is suspected of sex abuse. the suspect in the tucson massacre comes face to face with some of the victims. and overnight, a mother of one becomes a mother to nine keeping her family together after tragedy strikes. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. what, if anything, can the obama administration do about the situation in libya? as the white house continues to weigh its options, moammar qaddafi's forces keep pounding the opposition from the air and on the ground. 30 miles from tripoli, government troops retook most of zawiyah today after almost a week of bitter fighting. hospital officials report dozens of deaths on both sides. in the east, where the rebels control almost all
:30. and happy st. patrick's day. >>> good morning. breaking news. the u.s. government gets set to begin evacuating americans from japan as danger levels remain high at the crippled nuclear plan this, despite new attempts by military helicopters to cool off the plant's overheated reactors and fuel rods. the top u.s. nuclear regulator says conditions at the plant are much worse than japanese officials say and recommends that americans say 50 miles away. this morning questions about nearly two dozen nuclear reactors with the very same design "early" this thursday morning, march 17th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. scenes from earlier. military choppers, japanese military helicopters dropping sea water on this nuclear plant a part of the last-ditch effort to bring sea water in ho help cool down the fuel pools and also the nuclear rods there at this facility. >> that is the effort from the sky. also hearing about water cannons on the ground as they try to bring things in there. we are learning this morning that the pen
is this supposed to work? >> well, good morning, betty. the u.s. makes no quick exit from libya, as it had hoped. nato does take over the no-fly zone, but the u.s. remains firmly in charge of the brunt of the combat there. american warplanes will continue to fly strike missions over libya, for now. >> this operation has already saved many lives. but the danger is far from over. >> reporter: thursday, nato agreed to take over partial command from the u.s. the 28-nation alliance could begin enforcing the no-fly zone as early as this weekend. but american forces would still be involved in everything from surveillance to bombing specific targets. >> we will continue to apply the pressure we can to compel them to stop killing their own people. >> reporter: coalition jets pounded the country for a sixth straight day thursday, hitting a military base, and a libyan plane that violated the no-fly zone. still, government forces continued their assault on rebels in the western city of misrata. hospitals there were inundated with victims. while natos aagreed to only a partial takeover, that could soon chang
the rebels in several key cities, u.s. aid arrives in tunisia for refugees fleeing the violence. the tragic death of a star high school athlete just moments after he leads his team to victory. and they call this the most dangerous eight seconds in sports. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. president obama is keeping his exuberance in check over today's news about unemployment. he calls it progress. the unemployment rate-- 9% or higher for a record 21 months-- has finally dropped below that mark, falling last month to 8.9%. and the pace of hiring is picking up. the economy added 192,000 jobs. anthony mason is our senior business correspondent. anthony, the recession has been officially over for months now. finally it looks like the job market is catching up. >> reporter: after months of disappointingly weak numbers, katie, the labor market is finally flexing some muscle. in wisconsin this week, the oshkosh corporation was hiring 750 workers to make military vehicles. >>
on the radicalization of muslims in the u.s., but is it a matter of national security, or a u.s., but is it a matter of national security, or a witch-hunt? captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. >>> the three-week budget battle in wisconsin that has made national headlines appears to be over. it ended swiftly and unexpectedly. republican members of the state senate outmaneuvered their absentee democratic colleagues to pass a bill which sharply limits union rights. >> this is a violation of law. >> the vote caught almost everyone by surprise. by 18-1 the state senate passed a measure stripping collective bargaining rights from most of wisconsin's public employees, handing governor scott walker a stunning victory in the three-week labor standoff. in a statement he applauded lawmakers for taking, quote, a step in the right direction to balance the budget, and reform government. senate democrats had fled the state to avoid any votes, but republicans found a way to push the measure through. they removed all elements of the bill that involved bud
you! [ laughter ] >> couric: tonight, japan asks for u.s. help cooling nuclear reactors damaged by the earthquake as it tries desperately to prevent meltdown. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the unfolding humanitarian crisis. four days after the earthquake and tsunami, there are shortages of food and housing for the living. body bags and coffins for the growing number of dead. the search goes on for victims in towns virtually wiped off the map. and how safe are we with nuclear plants here at home built on fault lines and striking distances of tsunamis. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone, any one of them alone would be overwhelming, but japan is dealing with three crises: humanitarian, economic, and nuclear, including the possibility of a meltdown. we'll have much more about that in a moment. it's tuesday morning in japan and four days after the earthquake and tsunami. the death toll continues to rise. officially 1,900, but one local police chief estimates 10
. >>> four new york journalistst held in libya have been released. the u.s. says it expects to turn control of the libyan military mission over to the french or the british in just a matter of days. this after several days of pounding by coalition forces in the air and on the sea. a top france official said it's likely to be a long one. we have a live report from washington on where the united states stand this morning, coming up. >>> more smoke seen at that damaged nuclear power plant. >> more smoke came from the reactor. officials say it probably killed more than 18,000 people. the world bank says it could take five years to rebuild and cost $235 billion. you can support disaster relief efforts. text the red cross to donate $10. >>> the barry bonds trial, we've been talking about it for years now starts in just a few hours. ann is in san francisco where jury selection is the first step. finally getting it going. good morning, ann. >> reporter: that's right. jury selection will be at 8:30 this morning. dozens of them filled out questionnaires and this morning they will be selected. as far
a u.s. military jet crashed today and we just learned from the military it was apparently due to a mechanical problem. two crewmembers ejected safely and are both safe. this comes as united states scales back its role in operation odyssey dawn over libya. >>> international forces leading most of the latest missions against moammar qaddafi's forces. a third straight night of bombing has stopped their advances. but disorganization among the rebels is keeping them from taking advantage. a video that surfaced on youtube shows an attack on libya civilians. there is no word on possible casualties from the explosion. the u.n. security council has rejected libya as call for an emergency meeting to stop the military operations. and china is also calling for a cease-fire. the coalition force are planning to expand the no-fly zone. >>> new danger at the damaged nuclear power plant in japan. japanese nuclear safety officials say the pool for storing spent fuel is heating up and is near boiling. those high temperatures likely caused the steam that has been wafting out of reactor number 2.
is reactor 4. wednesday, u.s. officials warn the unit no longer has water in its spent fuel pools, meaning the fuel rods are completely exposed, with nothing to prevent them from melting down. the u.s. is urging all americans to steer clear of the troubled plant. late last night the state department stayed would arrange charter flights to help u.s. citizens leave japan. today, tokyo's airport was packed with travelers like barbara, eager to get out. >> i'm concerned because i really don't know the situation about the radiation. it keeps changing. >> reporter: all americans living within 50 miles of the plant are being encouraged to evacuate or stay indoors. that's 2.5 times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. president obama discussed the precautions the u.s. is taking in a phone call with japan's prime minister last night. he also vowed to do everything possible to help japan recover from its worst crisis since world war ii. the u.s. military will provide fire trucks and pumps from its bases here in japan but made clear that they would be manned by japanese forces. liv
a mystery, despite his promises of a long war with the u.s. and its allies. defense secretary gates says the lsu hand over control of the however, questions remain about america's long-term exit strategy. disaster in japan. workers get another scare as smoke rises from the crippled nuclear plant and residents are being warned about contaminated drinking water and food. this as the estimated death toll jumps to more than 18,000 "early" this monday morning, march 21st, 2011. >>> and good morning. good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a monday morning, i'm chris wragge. >> i'm erica hill. good to have you with us. >> following two very major stories this morning. first of which the situation in japan. all eyes on that nuclear facility in fukushima once again. this as reports as i mention a few moments ago, smoke emanating from that troubled reactor 3 there. and now reports of radiation levels detected radiation levels in both the food and the water in that safety zone around the nuclear plant right now. we're going to continue to follow this and have an update on the situation t
and radar sites knocked out coalition forces are now patrolling the no-fly zone over libya. the u.s. is now preparing to assume a support role. but as joel brown reports, libyan leader moammar gadhafi says he is going to fight on. >> reporter: u.s. fighter jets are working with coalition forces to expand the no-fly zone over libya. a weekend of punishing air strikes and cruise missile attacks succeeded in keeping libyan planes grounded. a coalition missile blasted moammar gadhafi's residential compound in tripoli late yesterday. >> why is this rocket here? >> reporter: the u.s. officials say gadhafi's forces were using the location as a military command and control center. in the eastern city of benghazi, gadhafi loyalists fought rebels in the street overnight but the coalition air assault took out dozens of gadhafi tanks before they reached the city. >> the ground forces that were in the vicinity of benghazi now possess little will or capability to resume offensive operations. >> reporter: as government fighters are retreated, the rebels vowed not to stop until they reach tripoli. the coal
. meanwhile, two u.s. warships passed through the suez canal today heading closer to libya. defense secretary robert gates says they could be used to evacuate civilians. the libyan border is overwhelmed with refugees. 30,000 are waiting to get into tunisia. and some foreign workers were able to get out on ships bound for egypt. but back to today's major development, qaddafi's failed offensive in brega. mandy clark was there and reports tonight from benghazi. >> reporter: this is the excitement of victory in the town near today's major battle, cars bearing rebel fighters braced the front line. their comrades splashed water on them and cheered. when word came in of an apparent rebel victory down road, this was a scene of wild celebration. but now these fighters are rushing to get a new shipment of weapons ready for any possible counter-attack. the battle began with an assault by government troops before dawn and included bombing runs by qaddafi's warplanes. >> reporter: by late afternoon, the rebels were on the offensive. down the road, survivors arrived at a chaotic emergency room. they are me
the beginning. >>> the u.s. opened fire on libya. what prompted president obama's decision and how moammar gadhafi is reacting. >> and an ammonia leak prompts a shelter in place order in san jose. >>> it is 7:30 a.m. on sunday, march 20th. spring is just about here but i don't think mother nature got the memo. >> no. no. look outside, ok. spring is here, it's sprung. a lot of news to talk about. we'll look at the weather a lot closer, as well. we have john hademan back from tokyo to talk about the earthquake and its effect on the economy >> he was there when the disaster struck. and in the next half hour, in the 8:00 section, we'll talk about what is going on and what's not going on in sacramento. and how it's going to affect you. >> that's as we approach a deadline for making that special election happen in june. a lot coming up. >>> i think the top story locally is the weather. there is some local flooding out there. the rain has been coming down, and it looks like going to keep on coming for a little while. jim bernard has the latest. we're checking in with you. storm watch, how is it l
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